In other news


January 13, 2010 By

Welcome to the weekly roundup of blog posts that mention Nexus, Maven, and other projects that Sonatype developers contribute to.

Java.net blogs: Maven Mythbusters #2 – Maven requires an internet connection to delete a directory
“Maven seems to be one of those topics that brings out passion in many developers. In this series of articles, I want to take a look at some of the common myths and ideas that circulate about Maven, and see how they stand up to the light of scientific examination. Last time, we looked at the idea that Maven automatically updates for every build. This time we look at another myth quoted in this article: that Maven requires an internet connection to delete a directory.”
By John Ferguson Smart, on January 11, 2010

Java Evangelist John Yeary’s Blog: Book Review: Maven By Example
“I received a copy of 0.2.1 of the Maven By Example book from Tim O’Brien from Sonatype. I was in the process of learning Maven and moving some of my projects to Maven when Tim contacted me and offered the book to me. He also included a number of copies to give away at my local JUG. This turned out to be a really good book on learning Maven. It is a Creative Commons licensed book so that it offers the community a chance to update the book and add content. Like any great open source project, giving the community to have a direct chance to update the project produces a better final product.”
By John Yeary, on January 11, 2010

I, me and myself: Packaging and deploying an akka-application with maven
“I’ve been working a lot with akka (Scala Remote Actors) lately and i needed a way to package my project efficiently so i could quickly remotely deploy it on my akka host.”
By Franz Bettag, on January 10, 2010

I, me and myself: Managing Maven-Repositories on your server
“Everyone who uses Java/Scala and Maven a lot probably has his/her own mvn-repo on his webserver somewhere. If you do, i guess you also know about the fact that maven tries to fetch .md5, .sha1 and .pom-files for the supplied jars. Since you don’t always get those with your .jar-files, and i am a very lazy person, i’ve hacked up a simple shell-script for fixing just that and saving you time for more fun stuff.”
By John Yeary, on January 9, 2010

Geertjan’s Blog: 10 Steps to Get Started with Maven on the NetBeans Platform
“Aside from the (currently) missing exhaustive reference material for the NetBeans Platform (mitigated by the NetBeans API javadoc and Essential NetBeans Platform Reference Card), the other BIG gap in the NetBeans Platform documentation is… everything relating to Maven. Much can be discovered via google (e.g., type the following keywords in google “NetBeans Platform Maven” and/or “NetBeans RCP Maven”). ”
By Geertjan, on January 06, 2010

Java.net blogs: Maven Mythbusters – Maven automatically updates for every build
“Maven seems to be one of those topics that brings out passion in many developers. Apparently, some developers love it, and find it a highly valuable and time-saving tool, whereas others hate it with a passion. (Of course there are still others who just want to get on with the job, but those ones usually keep quiet on the blogosphere). Every once in a while someone comes out with a blog entry explaining in more or less detail what they dislike so much about Maven. Sometimes these articles contain constructive criticism that allows Maven to evolve in the right direction. That’s great. Sometimes they contain inaccuracies or misunderstandings about how Maven works. Sometimes they are just downright wrong. But they nevertheless represent a perception of Maven in parts of the Java community. So in this series of articles, I want to take a look at some of the common myths and ideas that circulate about Maven, and see how they stand up to the light of scientific examination.”
By John Ferguson Smart, on January 6, 2010

Java.net: Maven Repository Managers for the Enterprise
“If you use Maven, or even if you just use Maven repositories for your dependency management, you should be using a Maven Repository Manager. It’s like using a kayak without paddles: you’ll get there eventually without them, but your life will be much easier if you are properly equipped.”
By John Ferguson Smart, on Mon, 2010-01-04

Karsten’s Blog: Building TMF Xtext projects with Maven
“Normally Xtext projects are built within the Eclipse IDE. But what do you do if the requirement is to have server side builds for for Xtext based projects, including the Grammar project itself, and of course without checking in generated sources? Setting up a working build process for Eclipse plugin projects is often a hell. I often face this requirement, and this is where Maven is a suitable alternative. This article explains how you can build Xtext based projects with Maven.”
By Karsten Thoms, on July 20, 2009