Tag Archives: component vulnerabilities

Stewing Over Software Ingredients


July 15, 2014 By
Ryan Berg
Fresh Ingredients

Just the other day I was planning dinner for my family and thought it would be a great idea to bust out the Dutch oven I had to have, but rarely use, and make a nice stew. I ran to the grocery store to grab some fresh carrots, turnips, onions, a couple of Yukon Gold potatoes, and some fresh chicken (and a bottle of nice wine for the thirsty chef). I needed a quick start and an on-time finish. Or it would be another failed product delivery — followed by a rapid desire by my family to outsource.

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Cheeseburger Risk: Not for the Faint of Heart


May 20, 2014 By
Derek Weeks
Cheeseburger Risk

If you had a heart attack, would you stop eating cheeseburgers? For most people, the answer is “No”. A recent survey of 1,000 survivors found that 60 percent of heart attack victims weren’t sticking to a healthy diet and about 30 percent still had high cholesterol and blood pressure. Hey, old habits (especially the tasty ones) die hard. Funny thing is, the same behavior for those who have suffered a heart attack is found in application security. If you have been breached, chances are you have not changed your security diet.

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Part 3: How Your Software Is Like a Car – Bad Parts Make for Bad Software


May 14, 2014 By
Wayne Jackson
Component Complexity

In part two of my blog ‘A Closer Look at Today’s Software Supply Chain’, I discussed why human-speed supply chain management can’t keep pace with today’s agile software development practices and why high quality software components are not simply a given. In this final segment, I will share a real world story on how thousands of organizations sourced one “bad part” named Bouncy Castle in 2013.

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Are OpenId and OAuth ‘Bleeding’?


May 7, 2014 By
Ryan Berg
OpenId and OAuth

Now that Heartbleed has become the new measuring stick for vulnerability disclosures, I have had several people ask me, “Is this OpenId/Oauth thing the next Heartbleed?” The long answer, as Run DMC once said, is “It’s Tricky, Tricky, Tricky, Tricky”. The TL/DR (too long/didn’t read) answer is “No”.

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Like a Good Holiday, the Verizon Breach Report is Here


May 2, 2014 By
Ryan Berg
Verizon Data Breach Report

Like a good holiday the Verizon 2014 Data Breach Investigation Report (DBIR) is something I look forward to every year. Now that I’ve had some office time to digest this, I figured no better time to share my thoughts. I am not going to cover all sections, but do want to highlight a few things that stuck out to me

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Do you trust your software supplier? Questions to ask yourself – and them!


July 24, 2013 By
Jessica Dodson

Ever since I attended the recent Gartner Security & Risk Management Summit, I’ve found myself thinking a lot about if “you can trust your software supplier”. My colleague wrote about this a bit in a Gartner recap blog and our CEO co-presented on this topic with Curtis Yanko as part of a solution provider session. […]

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Good Hygiene Should be a Foundation of Application Security


June 19, 2013 By
Ryan Berg

Over the past week, there have been several articles, blog posts and security institutes about the latest release of the OWASP Top 10. Now is the right time to join the discussion. All this chatter doesn’t come as a surprise to me or others that have been long time participants in the application security space. […]

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Is it time for a Nexus Repository Health Check? Come to the Nexus Office Hours to get your Diagnosis.


May 27, 2013 By
Jessica Dodson

If your repository contained a jar file with a known vulnerability, how would you know? What would it mean to you to have that sort of visibility into your repository health? This isn’t probably something you consider often since one of the benefits of having a repository manager is enforcing component standards. But as you […]

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Vulnerability database infected for at least two months


March 19, 2013 By
The Vigilant Application Owner

Downed US vuln catalog infected for at least TWO MONTHS. A vulnerability in Adobe’s ColdFusion software allowed the National Vulnerability Database and other National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) Web sites to be infected with malware, prompting NIST to take them offline. Source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/03/14/adobe_coldfusion_vulns_compromise_us_malware_catalog/

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